it was only on the surface and I immediately dismissed it because “a man” brought it to my attention.

I remember a time when I first heard of Kama Sutra, it was only on the surface and I immediately dismissed it because “a man” brought it to my attention.  I guess I assumed it was just sexual positions.  Not just sexual positions, but looked to me like you had to be a contortionist to perform such positions!  Do you all agree?  What is your thought when you view these illustrations?  Certainly, I am not alone!  Now I’m not saying I haven’t “tried” a few of these, smirk.

I wanted to dive deeper into the history of this art of sex and see just what it is all about.  Especially when I made the discovery it was written in Sanskrit.  The yoga journey is never ending isn’t it?

What I’ve discovered in my research is there is common misconception regarding the Kama Sutra

What I’ve discovered in my research is there is common misconception regarding the Kama Sutra is the assumption by non-eastern cultures that the text is itself a guidebook to rituals relating to tantric sex. (Tantra, in the simplest terms, is a state referring to mastery of the self which in western cultures has become associated with highly ritualized sexual prowess, yes I had to look this up, meaning; skill or expertise in a particular activity or field).

n the grand scheme of things, the description of sexual desires and positions is very small, intended primarily to help individuals reach the full potential of one of the four virtuous goals of existence.

In truth, while sexual positions are dictated pragmatically in the text, and the text exemplifies how desire can aid in unleashing the full extent of an individual’s personal power, these dictations are intended more as guidelines for virtuous living. The Kama Sutra does not relate to tantric rites or practices, nor is it a sacred doctrine of sexual rituals. In the grand scheme of things, the description of sexual desires and positions is very small, intended primarily to help individuals reach the full potential of one of the four virtuous goals of existence.  This is one of the first systematic studies of human sexual behavior in world literature. It also documents the sociology of sex in India eighteen centuries ago.

Written (likely) by Vatsyayana possibly around the 2 nd century AD, scholars believe his intention was to highlight one of the four virtues of life. Kama, as previously mentioned, indicates enjoying the senses; the other three goals are dharma (virtuous living), artha (material wealth), and moksha (liberation—usually indicating freedom from the cycle of reincarnation). The Kama Sutra is made up of seven books, each discussing and describing a different form of pleasure through which one can achieve kama. A common misconception is that the length of the Kama Sutra ‘s seven books dictates sexual intercourse; in truth, only one chapter in one of these seven books talks about sexual positions.

Is Kamasutra just an old Indian myth? How does it fit in modern days sexuality? Is this just some sex positions to spice things up or is it a source of happiness beyond sex?  

How will you spend your time while we are becoming a distancing society?  Dive deeper into some things you are curious about.  Or find deeper connection with that someone you care about, before we become too distant…

References:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/sex/kama/

“The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana.” 2003. (trans. Sir Richard Burton, 1883.) Accessed October 19, 2017

Doniger, Wendy. 2003. Kamasutra. Oxford University Press.

Hopkins, Thomas J. 1971. The Hindu Religious Tradition . Cambridge: Dickenson Publishing Company, Inc.